Workshop--Innovation, Investment, and the Open Internet

Workshop--Innovation, Investment, and the Open Internet

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The fundamental flaw of Ethernet is that it requires routers.

Leave the carrier backbone alone, however migrate the middle and last mile to a broadcast architecture that does not require routers. It's called The Q from Ether2. This technology will eliminate bottlenecks and support stable QoS no matter how many nodes or how much traffic is on the network (up to 110%). IPTV quality will surpass cable/sat, the digital divide will be closed, net neutrality will be a non-issue, and ...more »

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Workshop--Innovation, Investment, and the Open Internet

Submitted by (@dave.kliman)

100 mbits? that's IT? come on guys.

How disappointing to see the FCC set such a low low low goal for our internet speeds in 10 years. even today, we could already have TERABIT per user speeds using a truly optical network. we already have much of the fiber necessary. I'm just sad that they have set the bar so very low. so low, indeed, that the 100mbit speed is already something many other countries have TODAY... and to hope to have that in TEN YEARS? ...more »

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Workshop--Innovation, Investment, and the Open Internet

Submitted by (@dave.kliman)

A swift kick in the butt...

is what this country needs. Google had the right idea when it announced in the last few days that they'd be trying out a gigabit fully neutral internet connection for maybe up to 500,000 users. that's a gigabit UP and DOWN... with no data shaping. no looking at our data. no limits. and a cost of only about $20 a month... If you look at what happened to the economy in the wake of the commercialization of the internet, ...more »

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Workshop--Innovation, Investment, and the Open Internet

Submitted by (@dave.kliman)

The panelists missed a very important point...

I attended this workshop yesterday, and I got to listen to and converse with several of the panelists. The frustrating talk that I heard a lot from people on the panel was how, "well if this isn't profitable for the monopoly isps, then i guess we'll have to... *pay more *go slower *do less *give up freedom *compromise so that they can remain profitable when they 'offer us internet service.'" The representative from ...more »

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