Copyright Issues

Only attribution rights are enforceable. "Copy" rights are not.

In order for you to be able to read this text, the characters I type are copied from my keyboard signal translator to a buffer in my computer's memory. At the same time, each character is copied from a font store to my screen buffer, so I can see what I'm typing. As soon as I hit the "Post Idea" button, my buffer contents are sent over the network to the FCC servers. To make this trip, the text, routing information, and ...more »

Submitted by (@takeymctaker)

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6 votes
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Copyright Issues

Copy-rights have never been recognized in the immoral USA

This will become obvious to even Google Inc by the time my lawsuit completes. Copy-right has never had anything to do with a right. It has always been simply a rite whereby the prices of publicly distributing ideas was fixed. A judge, Benjamin Huntington, appointed to Congress conspired with an early textbook publisher, Noah Webster, and plagiarized the 1710 Statute of Anne that had recently established King George's ...more »

Submitted by (@curtisneeley)

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-4 votes
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Workshop--Innovation, Investment, and the Open Internet

The panelists missed a very important point...

I attended this workshop yesterday, and I got to listen to and converse with several of the panelists. The frustrating talk that I heard a lot from people on the panel was how, "well if this isn't profitable for the monopoly isps, then i guess we'll have to... *pay more *go slower *do less *give up freedom *compromise so that they can remain profitable when they 'offer us internet service.'" The representative from ...more »

Submitted by (@dave.kliman)

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-6 votes
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Workshop--Innovation, Investment, and the Open Internet

A swift kick in the butt...

is what this country needs. Google had the right idea when it announced in the last few days that they'd be trying out a gigabit fully neutral internet connection for maybe up to 500,000 users. that's a gigabit UP and DOWN... with no data shaping. no looking at our data. no limits. and a cost of only about $20 a month... If you look at what happened to the economy in the wake of the commercialization of the internet, ...more »

Submitted by (@dave.kliman)

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11 votes
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Workshop--Innovation, Investment, and the Open Internet

100 mbits? that's IT? come on guys.

How disappointing to see the FCC set such a low low low goal for our internet speeds in 10 years. even today, we could already have TERABIT per user speeds using a truly optical network. we already have much of the fiber necessary. I'm just sad that they have set the bar so very low. so low, indeed, that the 100mbit speed is already something many other countries have TODAY... and to hope to have that in TEN YEARS? ...more »

Submitted by (@dave.kliman)

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34 votes
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Workshop--Innovation, Investment, and the Open Internet

The fundamental flaw of Ethernet is that it requires routers.

Leave the carrier backbone alone, however migrate the middle and last mile to a broadcast architecture that does not require routers. It's called The Q from Ether2. This technology will eliminate bottlenecks and support stable QoS no matter how many nodes or how much traffic is on the network (up to 110%). IPTV quality will surpass cable/sat, the digital divide will be closed, net neutrality will be a non-issue, and ...more »

Submitted by

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3 votes
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Application of the Principles to Mobile Broadband

all devices: open and unlocked. Licensed devices, not licensed providers.

The law used to be in place and it should be restored. There cannot be any jailed and/or locked devices. they must all adhere to all the public protocols any user would like to use. I'm talking to you Apple and AT&T. There should be a vast swath of beachfront bandwidth allocated to free multi-way service. If there were such a swath of bandwidth, then anybody anywhere should be able to add to the national information ...more »

Submitted by (@dave.kliman)

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85 votes
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Application of the Principles to Mobile Broadband

Don't let commercial interests make a grab for WIFI frequencies

WIFI should remain open, especially in public spaces, because it was meant for information infrastructure, not to be used as an income source for cable and phone companies. Cable and phone companies have been preventing municipalities all around the country from putting up big public wifi systems through lobbying. they instead have been putting up their own garden walled wifi networks that require users to be a subscriber ...more »

Submitted by (@dave.kliman)

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3 votes
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Application of the Principles to Mobile Broadband

No Closed WIFI

Cable and Phone companies around the country are trying to hijack public wifi frequencies for their own profit. As part of net neutrality rules, no public wifi should be closed to the public. There should be no passwords and no "terms and conditions" to utilize what is part of public airwaves. Open standards and open networks are necessary if we are to have innovation, and to have a large swath of public wifi space ...more »

Submitted by (@dave.kliman)

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-4 votes
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Application of the Principles to Mobile Broadband

Unlimted Data, means unlimited data through your cellular modem

Cellular and mobile broadband providers should not be able to get away with this. If you advertise a service for "Unlimited" data, that therefore means that they will get as much data as they want, with the best data rate possible. This also means that you will never cap usage daily, weekly, monthly, yearly or for the life of their service. If I have an unlimited plan, a truly unlimited plan, not "unlimited... up to ...more »

Submitted by (@actorandrew)

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-12 votes
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Application of the Principles to Mobile Broadband

Extend network neutrality to device usage neutrality

Pass laws that extend network neutrality to devices using the internet. For example, recently blackberry users were forced to use Microsoft's Bing and could no longer specify a preferred search service. For more details please see

 

http://pogue.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/12/22/verizons-new-motto-why-not-be-evil/

Submitted by (@tiddledo)

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-102 votes
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