Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Notes on Internet Access

I have worked in the telecommunications industry for many years, and have been certified as a switch technician and as a lineman. I will tell you now that in order to level the playing field for all who connect to the internet through a broadband provider, we must require disclosure of how access to the internet is monitored and maintained. Those who have worked in this industry can verify that there are lots of ways ...more »

Submitted by (@marybbrinkman)

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83 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Require open access to the 'rules of the road'

Though it may be necessary for ISP's to throttle network traffic, the way in which they do so should be transparent. The rules of the road should be free and public, and if our bandwidth is being restricted we should be able to find out why, easily and painlessly.

Submitted by (@m.cannamela)

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20 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Warning lables like the ones on cigarettes for companies that throttle

These people need to know that the 50mbps plan they just bought only applies to a small percentage of the content. Its all about truth in advertising. Every advertisement, letter, or bill talking about the speed the company is giving needs to state that they throttle their content.

Submitted by (@agronick)

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19 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Enact "Broadband Facts" labeling

Broadband Internet access needs a clear, concise, and standard "Broadband Facts" that coalesce all pertinent facts of a connection into something analogous to Nutrition Facts on food.

 

 

 

http://www.newamerica.net/publications/policy/broadband_truth_labeling

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2009/10/does-broadband-needs-its-own-government-nutrition-label.ars

Submitted by (@shawnlandden)

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18 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Don't tell me 'Unlimited' when you mean 'limited'

Contracts should not be misleading by stating a data-plan or broadband service is 'unlimited' when really the contract provider has some secret idea of when it is OK to start limiting your service, or what services they don't want to work so well due to their personal conflicts of interest. If the internet service is limited, then state so and price accordingly. Right now they are boasting high speeds, then throttling ...more »

Submitted by (@perryhernandez)

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16 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Clear specifications detailing the process

Internet Service Providers should be required to release specifications for their network management process. These specifications should be detailed enough that a 3rd party could make a model of the process. Companies that argue producing the specifications would be to costly are lying. The specifications should already exist for the programmers to use. I won't pretend to know how to manage network traffic, but I do ...more »

Submitted by (@camjwest)

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11 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Ban the use of DOCSIS in throttling user speeds.

The use of the software tool known as DOCSIS needs to be banned. This was partly at the heart of the Comcast issue of 2008, outed in 2007 when it was discovered that Comcast was slowing down a customer's downloading of legal Bittorrent files, such as from major video houses, online. Comcast was sending out fake 'download failed' error messages, and the user being none the wiser initially, closed the download. But he ...more »

Submitted by (@genealogy248)

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8 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Looking for better documentation on actual proposal

I am reading the NPRM published here: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-09-93A1.pdf It is supposed to be 200 pages but I only see 107. I think before we decide to pass legislation on this we should understand exactly what is being proposed. Almost all the comments on here I have seen amount to "open internet is good, I vote yes" but nobody seems to be looking at the actual specific items and deciding ...more »

Submitted by (@onlybyforce)

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6 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Re-classify Limited Access Providers

ISPs, IACs and carriers which choose to filter destinations, protocols, keywords or to throttle normal traffic, could be re-classified as "Select Media Access Providers". Select Media Access Providers should be excluded from government programs, funding, preferences, protections or any other publicly funded initiative aimed at enhancing access to the public Internet for citizens. Discrimination of content dilutes ...more »

Submitted by (@escapevelocity)

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5 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

FCC takes first steps to regulate Broadband Internet

FCC moves to gain more authority over broadband service

 

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-0618-fcc-broadband-20100618,0,5300272.story

Submitted by (@steve.nadelle1)

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4 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

Are some corporate CEO’s, doctors, lawyers, politicians and scie

By Rick Nauert PhD Senior News Editor Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on July 3, 2006 Are some corporate CEO’s, doctors, lawyers, politicians and scientists psychopaths? The answer could be “yes” if you use a definition which labels individuals who are often intelligent and highly charismatic, but display a chronic inability to feel guilt, remorse or anxiety about any of their actions. Tack on the use of violence ...more »

Submitted by (@glendwhite)

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4 votes
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Transparency/Disclosure of Network Management Practices

keep it 'free' in the truest sense of the term

As you know, nearly all individuals who access the Internet, pay for the privilege. Since this is the case, and the fact is Not contested, it is disturbing to hear some of the 'proposals' from the Big Telcos. Access should be uninhibited. If any consumer has a Home PC, or Home Network, with hardware capable of and configured to afford the maximum Through Put which their ISP is capable of offering, then they should be ...more »

Submitted by (@cyberbuf)

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4 votes
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